Effect of Organic Acids and Marination Ingredients on the Survival of Campylobacter jejuni on Meat – Wine Vinegar Mentioned

February 14, 2010

Effect of Organic Acids and Marination Ingredients on the Survival of Campylobacter jejuni on Meat – Wine Vinegar Mentioned

Researchers in Denmark undertook a study to determine whether marination of chicken meat in different food ingredients can be used to reduce populations of Campylobacter jejuni. The study was recently published in the Journal of Food Protection (Vol. 73, No.2, 2010, pages 258 – 265). Of note, the researchers write:

To compose an efficient antibacterial marinade, the antibacterial effects of different food ingredients on C. jejuni inoculated onto broiler meat medallions were evaluated. The most efficient food ingredient was wine vinegar either alone or in combination with red wine and soya [soy sauce]. The antibacterial activity of wine vinegar continued during 3 days of storage, whereas the other ingredients and acids were effective only within the first 24 h of storage. Wine vinegar is a fermentation product of wine and contains a combination of organic acids (acetic acid, tartaric acid and citric acid) and other fermentation metabolites. Lemon juice, which had the lowest pH (2.7), was not as effective as wine vinegar (pH 3.4) for reducing the population of C. jejuni.