Vinegar Curbs Appetite

December 21, 2005

Vinegar Curbs Appetite

The Vinegar Institute earlier reported that a recent Swedish study found that consuming vinegar with white bread cut expected rises in insulin and blood sugar. The study also found that subjects felt fuller. The research is titled, “Vinegar supplementation lowers glucose and insulin responses and increases satiety after a bread meal in healthy subjects” and was published in the September 2005 issue of theEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

According to the research, “A significant dose-response relation was seen at 30 min for blood glucose and serum insulin responses; the higher the acetic acid level, the lower the metabolic response. Furthermore, the rating of satiety was directly related to the acetic acid level.” The article notes that there is a rapid increase in obesity and diseases related to insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). It is also noted that evidence exists to substantiate that a diet characterized by a low GI (glycemic index) has benefits in both prevention and treatment of several diseases linked to IRS, such as cardiovascular disease.

Additionally, the researchers conclude, “The selection of pickled and fermented products or meal additives, and the use of vinegar-based drinks, which are currently introduced in the market, may provide means to reach efficient levels of acetic acid. Addition of vinegar to carbohydrate-rich meals of high-GI character, or the use of, for example, homofermentative, acetic acid producing starter cultures offers a potential to lower the GI and increase the postmeal satiety. The possible long-term health benefits of including pickled products or fermented products in the diet need to be examined.” The researchers also note that the level of acetic acid needed to elicit a response might be difficult to ingest as a salad dressing or as pickled vegetables.